Images, Thoughts on Travel, Equipment and Techniques that somehow relate to Nature & Wildlife Photography.

Details

Cottonwood leaf against red mud patterns; Pleasant Creek, Capitol Reef NP, Utah

Cottonwood leaf against red mud patterns; Pleasant Creek, Capitol Reef NP, Utah

They say the devil is in the details. Haven’t seen the devil but we have found a whole universe in the details, what Elliot Porter called the “intimate landscape”. When out trying to get a great scenic shot how many times have you had the light fizzle, the scene just not meet your expectations? If you have unlimited time that’s not much of an issue, just wait it out, something good is bound to happen. Most people don’t have boundless time to capture their vision. So, what do you do when all that planning or at least hoping goes south? We’ve all been there, I can’t tell you how many times a gray, high cloud has snuffed that spectacular late day light. But there you are, what to do?

"Eagle" eroding out of Navajo Sandstone, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

“Eagle” eroding out of Navajo Sandstone, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Iconic landscapes are a blessing and a curse, stunningly gorgeous places that are a joy to experience but have been photographed by virtually everyone. Finding that one-off shot that can set your image apart is difficult, requiring much time and luck. Who hasn’t wanted one of those killer shots of the Grand Canyon or Half Dome in Yosemite? You know, the one people tell you that should be in National Geographic.

Sandstone swirls, Crack Canyon, San Rafael Swell, Utah

Sandstone swirls, Crack Canyon, San Rafael Swell, Utah

That search for the Grand Landscape can blind us to the very things that make such a place special. Those are the details, a macro view of a place, the way wind and water has polished a rock, the way sand lays against a tree root, tracks in the snow. Another nice aspect of looking for the details is that these almost secret landscapes are everywhere. I suspect most of us from time to time travel the same routes that have become so familiar we no longer see them. We chase the light, when it refuses to be caught we just need to take a more contemplative look around. What do you do to salvage a view that just won’t cooperate?

sand patterns, looking like palm fronds created by surf at low tide; Playa Las Lajas, Panama

sand patterns, looking like palm fronds created by surf at low tide; Playa Las Lajas, Panama

Ice and sand patterns; Zion NP., UT

Ice and sand patterns; Zion NP., UT

Oak leaf litter; Colorado

Oak leaf litter; Colorado

Trail patterns in sand created by feeding snails at low tide; Playa Las Lajas, Panama

Trail patterns in sand created by feeding snails at low tide; Playa Las Lajas, Panama

Advertisements

5 responses

  1. Very nice details, great series. To be inspired.

    June 5, 2014 at 5:51 PM

    • Thanks Bente, we’ve always loved doing macro work since you never know what you’ll see when you look closely. Sometimes the best landscapes are the smallest. Happy to inspire!

      June 7, 2014 at 2:08 PM

  2. Those are wonderful patterns and textures that caught your eye.

    June 5, 2014 at 11:55 AM

    • Thanks very much Lyle, its amazing what we see when we take the time to look. What’s the intimate landscape look like up in your neck of the woods?

      June 5, 2014 at 2:38 PM

      • I totally agree. That’s a great question. Over the years my photography has followed my interests. At first they were everything in the natural world. Now it’s much more about wildlife. I find if I try to do too much, nothing is as good as I’d hoped. So I’m looking for wildlife and capturing other scenes by the way. But I still enjoy intimate landscapes like you posted.

        June 5, 2014 at 3:29 PM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s