Images, Thoughts on Travel, Equipment and Techniques that somehow relate to Nature & Wildlife Photography.

Red Tails

 

Red-tailed Hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]

The nest, exposed to the wind, rain and sun sits at eye level from the side of the hill. The moon and the stars of night watch over it. Mid morning the high-pitched skreeee of an adult Red-tailed Hawk alerts everyone and everything in this small valley that mom (or dad) is coming home with a meal. Three small white puffs of down don’t seem overly excited by this development. It takes a lot of energy to just hold that wobbly head up and really, mom is going to rip little pieces of that once living rodent into bite sized pieces just right for a little hawk to eat. And eat they do, and grow they do.

Pin feathers start to show up about 2 weeks after hatching.

Pin feathers start to show up about 2 weeks after hatching.

Food is sometimes shared but with 3 chicks, the youngest is usually left out until the others are full.

Food is sometimes shared but with 3 chicks, the youngest is usually left out until the others are full.

This is not as unremarkable as it might seem. Two years ago a huge, violent hail storm killed the three hatchlings of that year. Last year the scene was similar yet different, adult hawks standing on the edge of the nest, looking down at the three lifeless forms that seemed fine the day before. Those little guys probably were poisoned by the food the adults brought, a small amount of rodenticide may not kill an adult but will surely kill the little ones.

A good friend called and said the hawks were back on the nest. Getting a ring side seat is not always an easy thing, so the invite to come on down was welcome. This particular red-tail nest is a tad over two hours from home but the trip is through interesting and beautiful country. The decision to make the trip about once a week was easy.

So we watched these kids grow up knowing that fledging and adulthood are not a sure thing. Getting them there takes a lot of work. Finding, catching and getting those gophers and small snakes to the nest isn’t the end of it. Protecting the nest from potential enemies of the young hawks is also a full-time job. And there’s the neighbors. Land in the wrong tree and the adults are assaulted by (in this case) Stellar’s Jays, Robins and, unexpectedly Bullock’s Orioles. And that’s for just sitting there.

The smaller birds don't like a hawk perching near or in their territory.

The smaller birds don’t like a hawk perching near or in their territory.

I don’t know of a finer pastime than watching the world unfold as it should. Hope you agree, here are a few shots of “our” red-tails growing up.

Most birds of prey bring fresh green leaves or conifer needle clusters to the nest .... the vegetation may provide concealment from above, may serve as a natural coolant, or may reduce odors and fungal growths.  Conifer needles contain aromatic chemicals, called terpenes, that may repel insects and prevent a fungal disease.

Most birds of prey bring fresh green leaves or conifer needle clusters to the nest …. the vegetation may provide concealment from above, may serve as a natural coolant, or may reduce odors and fungal growths. Conifer needles contain aromatic chemicals, called terpenes, that may repel insects and prevent a fungal disease.

Where's mom, we're hungry!

Where’s mom, we’re hungry!

While one of the youngsters is exploring the tree above, groceries are delivered.

While one of the youngsters is exploring the tree above, groceries are delivered.

Rearranging the nest is one way to pass the time.

Rearranging the nest is one way to pass the time.

Exercising in the nest is another way.

Exercising in the nest is another way.

Fledged and learning to fly and land.

Fledged and learning to fly and land.

Thinking about the next limb up?

Thinking about the next limb up?

Fledged and curious about everything.

Fledged and curious about everything.

This is when the smaller catches up to its siblings.

This is when the smaller catches up to its siblings.

One of the perks of staying close to the nest. Its where the food is.

One of the perks of staying close to the nest. Its where the food is.

Sheesh....get a grip.

Sheesh….get a grip.

Landing in a small pinyon tree, this young hawk found itself facing inward with no obvious exit. Part of learning to fly and land is using their considerable intellect to get out of difficult places.

Landing in a small pinyon tree, this young hawk found itself facing inward with no obvious exit. Part of learning to fly and land is using their considerable intellect to get out of difficult places.

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7 responses

  1. Nancy

    Absolutely terrific. Thank you for sharing these truly wonderful photos.

    August 5, 2014 at 8:09 AM

    • Hi Nancy, always a pleasure to share what we are lucky enough to capture.

      August 5, 2014 at 3:02 PM

  2. Amazing post!

    August 5, 2014 at 4:04 AM

  3. Nice series. Nice to see the young ones.

    August 5, 2014 at 3:44 AM

    • Thanks Bente, when we find one of these nests they are usually impossible
      to photograph…this was a nice exception.

      August 5, 2014 at 2:53 PM

    • Bente, thanks for the comment. When we find one of these nests they are usually
      impossible to photograph…this was a nice exception.

      August 5, 2014 at 3:00 PM

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